Just Drawn That Way: Drawings by Michael Arthur

Just Drawn That Way: Drawings by Michael Arthur

Drawings I drew and other things.
My drawings are done directly in pen and ink with no rough drafts and no pencils: Each drawing is a live reaction to the moment.

Life with cats.

Directionless.

A drawing/poster I made for our @joespub show next month. I’ll be drawing live on the big screen with the band. Drawing along live with Balthrop, Alabama is the favorite thing I get to do. It’s convenient that I’m a member of Balthrop, Alabama; they’re my favorite band.

A drawing/poster I made for our @joespub show next month. I’ll be drawing live on the big screen with the band. Drawing along live with Balthrop, Alabama is the favorite thing I get to do. It’s convenient that I’m a member of Balthrop, Alabama; they’re my favorite band.

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut

In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”
I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”
I said, “Saul, are you gifted?”
Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut

In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”

I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”

I said, “Saul, are you gifted?

Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

Vacation Sketchbook page…

Vacation Sketchbook page…

A couple of years back, Summerstage in Central Park invited me to draw their shows. I ended up sitting in the wings or in the photo pit, sketching away for the day of Brazilian bands, Gil Scot Heron, the Flaming Lips and Public Enemy (among others)…

First try at video sequence for Margo by Jon Lindsay. Found this snippet when I was computer cleaning the other day. (A different version made it’s way into the finished video.)

Swirling Faces.

Swirling Faces.

Subway sketchbook.

Subway sketchbook.

Three guitarists.